I told you that this book was going to challenge me:

“God owns all things, whether we recognize it or not. But life becomes much clearer–and in some respects much easier–when we consciously recognize it. The question isn’t whether we theoretically allow God’s ownership. The question is whether we’ve deliberately transferred the ownership of ourselves and all our assets to him. Have we invited him to be what Scripture says he is–Creator, Owner, and Controller of us, family, possessions, and ‘our’ money? Have we extended the invitation again after we’ve forgotten and taken things back into our hands? This self-surrender to God is the beginning of true stewardship…

Not only does God own everything, God controls everything. Again, the implications are enormous. I don’t have to own everything. I don’t have to control everything. It’s in better hands than mine. When catastrophe strikes, I can honestly adopt the posture of John Wesley when he said, ‘The Lord’s house has burned down. That means one less responsibility for me.'” (Money, Possessions and Eternity, pps. 156-157)

While this book is certainly speaking to me about giving God control over finances, I’m also being challenged to recognize His sovereignty in every area of my life. I was reminded of this as I read this passage this morning:

For we are not our own masters when we live or when we die. While we live, we live to please the Lord. And when we die, we go to be with the Lord. So in life and in death, we belong to the Lord. (Romans 14:7-8)

I often need to be reminded that I–and every area of my life–belong to God. It truly does bring a sense of freedom in recognizing that my life is in God’s hands. As Alcorn said, His hands are far better than mine.

Do you find it easier to see God as owner and controller of your material possessions and finances rather than of the intangible parts of your life, such as relationships, family or health? What do you have the harder time yielding control over, the tangibles or the intangibles?

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