Book Review: Satisfied

First, a confession: I waited to start reading Satisfied: Discovering Contentment in a World of Consumption until after I’d taken a shopping trip. There’s nothing like a convicting message about how much I money I waste on things I don’t truly need to put a buzzkill on an otherwise pleasant trip to the outlet mall, right? At least that’s what I figured, which is why I held off on reading this book by Jeff Manion until after I’d gotten some spring clothes shopping done.

In all fairness, Satisfied, while certainly convicting, did not put me on the guilt trip I’d expected. It did, however, encourage me to examine my purchasing habits and remember that true contentment does not lie in anything I can buy. Manion is upfront and honest about his own struggles to find satisfaction, and I always seem to gain more from books like this where I can identify with the author.

Although a short read, the book is packed with wisdom and some anecdotes to help drive home Manion’s points. It’s divided into six parts: The School of Contentment, Comparison, Identity Shift, The Challenge of Affluence, The Generous Heart and The Invitation. I found myself particularly touched by the section on Comparison, as I know that I struggle with comparing myself to others and looking at what I don’t have rather than appreciating what I do have.

Each section ends with some discussion questions and suggested projects for practical application, making this book an easy one to incorporate into a small group study or class.

All in all, I found Satisfied to be a quick and enjoyable read that is challenging me to seek a counter-cultural life by focusing not so much on pursuing possessions but on seeking after God.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through theBookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255“Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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